David Lloyd George

David Lloyd George, 1st Earl Lloyd-George of Dwyfor,[a] OM, PC (17 January 1863 – 26 March 1945) was a British Liberal politician and statesman.

As Chancellor of the Exchequer (1908–1915), Lloyd George was a key figure in the introduction of many reforms which laid the foundations of the modern welfare state. His most important role came as the highly energetic Prime Minister of the Wartime Coalition Government (1916–22), during and immediately after the First World War. He was a major player at the Paris Peace Conference of 1919 that reordered Europe after the defeat of the Central Powers.

He made a greater impact on British public life than any other 20th-century leader, thanks to his pre-war introduction of Britain’s social welfare system (especially medical insurance, unemployment insurance, and old-age pensions, largely paid for by taxes on high incomes and on the land). Furthermore, in foreign affairs he played a leading role in winning the First World War, redrawing the map of Europe at the peace conference, and partitioning Ireland.

His main political problem was that he was not loyal to his Liberal party—he was always a political maverick. While he was Prime Minister he favoured the Conservatives in his coalition in the 1918 elections, leaving the Liberal party as a hopeless minority. He became leader of the Liberal Party in the late 1920s, but it grew even smaller and more divided. By the 1930s he was a marginalised and widely mistrusted figure. He gave weak support to the Second World War amidst fears that he was favourable toward Germany.

Synonyms:
Lloyd George
David Lloyd George (Wikipedia)
The Right Honourable
The Earl Lloyd-George of Dwyfor
OM PC
David Lloyd George.jpg
Prime Minister of the United Kingdom
In office
6 December 1916 – 19 October 1922
Monarch George V
Preceded by H. H. Asquith
Succeeded by Bonar Law
Leader of the Liberal Party
In office
14 October 1926 – 4 November 1931
Preceded by H. H. Asquith
Succeeded by Herbert Samuel
Secretary of State for War
In office
6 June 1916 – 5 December 1916
Prime Minister H. H. Asquith
Preceded by The Earl Kitchener
Succeeded by The Earl of Derby
Minister of Munitions
In office
25 May 1915 – 9 July 1916
Prime Minister H. H. Asquith
Preceded by Office created
Succeeded by Edwin Samuel Montagu
Chancellor of the Exchequer
In office
12 April 1908 – 25 May 1915
Prime Minister H. H. Asquith
Preceded by H. H. Asquith
Succeeded by Reginald McKenna
President of the Board of Trade
In office
10 December 1905 – 12 April 1908
Prime Minister Henry Campbell-Bannerman
H. H. Asquith
Preceded by The Marquess of Salisbury
Succeeded by Winston Churchill
Father of the House
In office
31 May 1929 – 13 February 1945
Preceded by T. P. O'Connor
Succeeded by The Earl Winterton
Member of Parliament
for Carnarvon Boroughs
In office
10 April 1890 – 13 February 1945
Preceded by Edmund Swetenham
Succeeded by Seaborne Davies
Personal details
Born (1863-01-17)17 January 1863
Chorlton-on-Medlock, Manchester, Lancashire, England
Died 26 March 1945(1945-03-26) (aged 82)
Tŷ Newydd, Caernarfonshire, Wales
Citizenship British
Nationality Welsh
Political party Liberal (1890–1916 & 1924–45)
National Liberal (1922–23)
Spouse(s)
Children
Profession solicitor, politician
Religion Nonconformist
Signature Cursive signature in ink

David Lloyd George, 1st Earl Lloyd-George of Dwyfor,OM, PC (17 January 1863 – 26 March 1945) was a British Liberal politician and statesman of Welsh parentage and upbringing.

As Chancellor of the Exchequer (1908–1915), Lloyd George was a key figure in the introduction of many reforms which laid the foundations of the modern welfare state. His most important role came as the highly energetic Prime Minister of the Wartime Coalition Government (1916–22), during and immediately after the First World War. He was a major player at the Paris Peace Conference of 1919 that reordered Europe after the defeat of the Central Powers.

He made a greater impact on British public life than any other 20th-century leader, thanks to his pre-war introduction of Britain's social welfare system (especially medical insurance, unemployment insurance, and old-age pensions, largely paid for by taxes on high incomes and on the land). Furthermore, in foreign affairs he played a leading role in winning the First World War, redrawing the map of Europe at the peace conference, and partitioning Ireland.

As Prime Minister, Lloyd George favoured the Conservatives in his coalition in the 1918 elections, leaving the Liberal Party a minority. He became leader of the Liberal Party in the late 1920s, but it grew even smaller and more divided. By the 1930s he was a marginalised and widely mistrusted figure. He gave weak support to the Second World War amidst fears that he was favourable toward Germany.

He was voted the third greatest British prime minister of the 20th century in a poll of 139 academics organised by MORI, and in 2002 he was named among the 100 Greatest Britons following a UK-wide vote.


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